One step closer to stricter distracted driving penalties in Alberta

One step closer to stricter distracted driving penalties in Alberta

Global News

EDMONTON – A bill that could increase penalties for distracted driving is closer to being put into action.

Calgary MLA Moe Amery is pushing the province to increase the fine from $172 to $250, as well as adding three demerit points to the driver’s license.

Bill 204, a private member’s bill put forward by Amery, passed third reading on Monday night. Amery introduced the bill in December saying the current deterrent wasn’t enough.

READ MORE: Alberta MLA wants to beef up distracted driving penalty

Alberta’s Justice Minister Jonathan Denis has said he’s spoken with local police agencies and demerit points are something  they want to pursue.

Alberta’s distracted driving law came into effect in Sept. 2011. The number of tickets issued continues to grow since the law came into effect, according to police.

READ MORE: Alberta’s distracted driving legislation not changing driver habits: RCMP 

There were 25,913 convictions for…

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These bad driving habits need to be outlawed already

These bad driving habits need to be outlawed already

New and Used Car Reviews, Comparisons and News | Driving

We rattle on at length about the stupid, illegal things people do while they’re driving. What about the stupid legal – or debatably and/or grey area legal – things that people do?

1. I’ve watched this one happen more than once, and it’s always like a telegraphed slow motion train wreck. You can see it coming. In bumper to bumper traffic in lousy weather, someone will be speeding along in the HOV lane. Yup, they’re one of the special ones and it’s legal and I’m jealous when I can’t do it, but watch that long line of red lights cramming the lanes beside zippedy-do-dah alley. If something mucks up over there, they’re going to dodge right into that open space to the left. By all means take advantage of your advantage, but continue to drive as if anything ahead of you could – and will – happen.

Summer road trips need summer driving music to be complete! If you can’t…

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The top five biggest reasons for failing a driving test

The top five biggest reasons for failing a driving test

New and Used Car Reviews, Comparisons and News | Driving

Giving your kid tips on passing their driving test? Why not start with the top reasons they might fail?

Tim Danter owns the DriveWise school in Oakville, Ont. He’s prepared thousands of teenagers for their roadway rite of passage.

Additionally, he carries out assessments for corporate fleets of drivers of all ages, getting a front row seat to how our driving improves as we age – and how it deteriorates.

Parallel parking: Eavesdrop on a roomful of 18-year-olds discussing their final road test, and you’ll hear a lot of talk about parallel parking. This was the bugaboo when I was getting my test; surely it’s a myth?

“No, you mess up the parallel parking badly enough, you’ll flunk your test,” according to Danter. “It’s about positioning, but it’s also about jumping the curb or not having control of the vehicle as you back up.”

Dangerous action: “If the examiner has…

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WATCH: It’s been 5 years, have distracted driving laws worked?

WATCH: It’s been 5 years, have distracted driving laws worked?

Global News

VANCOUVER — It’s been five years since it became illegal to talk on your phone or text while driving in BC. According to ICBC, between 2006 and 2010 there were an average of 95 fatal accidents. Those numbers dropped to 88 between 2009 and 2013.

“Clearly there is a lot more work to get done,” ICBC’s Jill Blacklock told Global News. She said talking or texting while driving is the second leading cause of fatal crashes in the province, just behind speeding and ahead of impaired driving. In October, tougher penalties were introduced in BC for drivers caught using their phones on the road.

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Almost all Canadians think texting and driving is ‘socially unacceptable’: poll

Almost all Canadians think texting and driving is ‘socially unacceptable’: poll

Global News

TORONTO – Nearly all Canadians agree that texting and driving is a bad idea, but many are still guilty of using their phone behind the wheel. According to a new poll from the Canadian Automobile Association (CAA), 90 per cent of Canadians believe texting and driving is socially unacceptable.

However, 22 per cent admitted to checking or sending text messages while driving.

“We still need to close that gap between belief and behaviour, but we are on the right track,” said Jeff Walker, CAA vice president of public affairs, in a press release.

“The next step is to make texting and driving as socially unacceptable as drinking and driving.”

The poll also found that Canadians rank texting and driving as their biggest road safety concern – drinking and driving came in second.

Those concerns may very well be warranted. According to collision data obtained by Global News from Toronto Police

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Sask. drivers not getting the message about texting behind the wheel

Sask. drivers not getting the message about texting behind the wheel

Global News

REGINA – Texting and driving appears to be more prevalent in Saskatchewan than in the rest of the country.

According to the Canadian Automobile Association (CAA), 22 per cent of Canadian drivers admitted to texting behind the wheel. However, in Saskatchewan, that number jumps significantly.

Thirty-five per cent of drivers in the province have used their phone to email or text while driving in the last month. Five per cent of those even admit to doing it regularly.

That seems about right, according to Regina resident Johnny Carroll, “I don’t find that surprising, I see people out texting and driving quite often.”

But that does not make it right, Carroll said: “I find it pretty stupid, because they’re putting their life and other people’s lives at risk.”

Christine Niemczyk with CAA Saskatchewan echoes that statement.

“Texting while driving isn’t safe. For the driver, for the passengers, for anybody on our roadways,”…

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